Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Real Estate Tuesday






















The awning in its later, greener days (top) and in brighter times (2009, bottom)


South Slope Fifth Avenue continues to transform.  Pop's Bazaar, at 19th, closed years ago, but the awning stayed, gathering moss, or mould or something else green .  652 Fifth was sold last summer for $750,000, and will be expanded up to a third floor.


















The Call Ahead vet's office, next door at 654, is on my agenda for a visit, now we have a ragged Southern terrier/hound hanging around the home.  In my search online for local vets, this place scores for the best prices, and charismatic ex-boxer Dr. Novick, who's practiced here for over twenty years, gets positive reviews.

Here's a corner building at Fifth & 20th all popped up.  In the background you can see the old furniture warehouse currently getting a conversion treatment.


















Work at the former White Eagle Tavern (23rd)  however,  is torpid, to say the least.  The building, like Pop's, sold last summer.  The price?  $1,650,000.  I imagine both 654 and 724 would sell for far higher sums today.



















Finally, we must turn to that  "Coming Soon!" banner (wink! wink!) at 18th, which has been amusing passers-by for many a month.  A fire in gutted the building in 2012, and took out an Associated Supermarket.




















Please note: the Like button now at the end of posts doesn't exactly have the look I intended. I will try to deal with this shortly.


Monday, July 21, 2014

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Garage Sale






















The sale of 389 Seventh Avenue, longtime home and business place of Italian barber Ercole Ricardelli, closed in May for two million dollars. Judged by the standards of today's unlikely real estate market , this seemed like a sweet deal for Hanshold LLC.  Clover Barber Shop closed in 2008, and Ricardelli died last year at the age of 91. The shop is to be replaced by a wine store.
Yesterday Enright's Estates held the first day of an onsite three day sale.  Contents: a world of personal and professional effects.  Out on the sidewalk, and piled inside the 12th Street side garage the tools of a lifetime's trade of barbering and the contents of a family home.



















A wealth of scissors, shaving brushes, straight razors, powders & boxes of dusty Pineaud hair tonics: Eau de Quinine, Eau de Portugal - "World Famous Since 1810."  How intimate the objects seemed.  You wanted to hold and examine them, but at the same time, it felt like an intrusive act.  And the family things: a pair of tiny, rusted roller skates, the contents of a kitchen's cupboards, heaps of mens' (Enrico's, one assumed) clothing, papal memorabilia, a bed's ornate headboard.  You wondered how you'd feel if your own belongings - trivial or prized - were put on display for public scrutiny.  And still you looked.  The child's car ride, the one the barber placed my son in after his first haircuts, was up for grabs at six hundred dollars - cheap at the price, we were told.   Not for me.




















But greedy soul that I am, I did want a piece of it all.  Here are the treasures I paid for.























See Jeremiah's Vanishing New York on Clover Barber Shop here.



Friday, July 18, 2014

Four Stores















A quartet of empty stores between 18th & 19th.  Torres decamped a block north a while back.  The breast pump concept - an incongruity here - never caught on.  Both 643 and 645 were sold recently - 645 for $1,420,000 to 645 JC Coin Realty LLC in May, & 643 to 643 5th LLC for $900,000 in February.


Thursday, July 17, 2014

The Last Glass

















Jackie's 5th Amendment closed last October, and today the green awning finally came down, as the pharmacy next door expands into the old bar's space. A worker told me that people had been by earlier, to take a part of the sign with the bar's name.


















Earlier:


















Taking the Fifth
Bar Talk
Not Quite Yet
Thursday Evening
Closed



Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Say What! It Ain't Mister (or Master) Softee

The sweetening of a neighborhood continues.  At Union & Nevins:

"Inside we found lots and lots of flavors including the delicious It Came From The Gowanus, which is Salty Dark Chocolate Ice Cream with Hazelnut, Crack cookies topped with White Chocolate Pearls and Orange-scented Brownies. Say What! Its flavor is the exact opposite of the stinky Canal that its name refers to. It’s like a flavor of…explosion-in-your-mouth-goodness! (we also heard they have a vegan sorbet for you none dairy folks, which is equally as awesome).
...One would never think that the Gowanus neighborhood would be known as the go-to for ice cream, but today that truly has changed. Now go stuff your face with ICE CREAM!" 
                                                                                       (Gowanus Your Face Off)
No prices on the Ample Hills website, but Menu Pages lists ice cream from $2.75 to $8.25 (per pint?), sundaes at $7.60, and ice cream cakes at $38.00 and $58.00.


305 (Bay Ridge)






















Off Third Avenue


Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Monday, July 14, 2014

315 8th Street



















315 8th Street, currently operating as the Templo Unido de las Asambleas de Dios, was once home to the Pequod Tribe of The Improved Order of Red Men, a fraternal men's club with roots tracing back to the Revolutionary War secret society The Sons of Liberty. The Society of Red Men was founded in 1813, and by '34 became The Improved Order of Red Men. By the late 1800s, the order was largely functioning as one of the nation's countless working men's fraternal organizations. As its name implies, the Order maintained a pseudo- Native American bent (reminiscent of Baden Powell's scouting lingo), and by the 1970s it adopted a nominal charitable support for Native-American welfare. At its heart the order has an extreme right-wing, anti-government ethos, though many tribes seemed to operate more as conservative-in-nature drinking clubs, with philanthropic activities, than overtly political organizations. The Order of Red Men was open to whites only until the 1970s. In the 1920s, the national membership was half a million strong, but by the seventies membership hovered around thirty thousand. Its strongest presence today, fittingly enough, is in Texas, and its national headquarters are based there, in Waco.























John D. Morell, 1960 (Brooklyn Visual Heritage)

" (The) Pequod Tribe, 294, meeting at Red Men Hall, 315 8th St., Thursday evening, adopted a class of 20 palefaces." 
(What's Going on in Lodge, Council & Other Fraternal Bodies,  Brooklyn Daily Eagle, May 26, 1935)
























A 1910 photograph of Washington State members